Treaty of Rome

  • treaty establishing the european economic community
    treaty of rome.jpg
    the signing ceremony of the treaty at the palazzo dei conservatori on the capitoline hill
    typefounding treaty
    signed25 march 1957
    locationcapitoline hill in rome, italy
    effective1 january 1958
    partieseu member states
    depositarygovernment of italy
    treaty establishing the european economic community at wikisource
    european union
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    politics and government of
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    the treaty of rome, officially the treaty establishing the european economic community (or eec treaty in short) brought about the creation of the european economic community (eec), the best-known of the european communities (ec). it was signed on 25 march 1957 by belgium, france, italy, luxembourg, the netherlands and west germany and came into force on 1 january 1958. under the name treaty on the functioning of the european union, it remains one of the two most important treaties in the modern-day european union (eu).

    the teec proposed the progressive reduction of customs duties and the establishment of a customs union. it proposed to create a single market for goods, labour, services, and capital across the eec's member states. it also proposed the creation of a common agriculture policy, a common transport policy and a european social fund, and established the european commission.

    the treaty has been amended on several occasions since 1957. the maastricht treaty of 1992 removed the word "economic" from the treaty of rome's official title and, in 2009, the treaty of lisbon renamed it the "treaty on the functioning of the european union".

  • history
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

Treaty establishing the European Economic Community
Treaty of Rome.jpg
The signing ceremony of the Treaty at the Palazzo dei Conservatori on the Capitoline Hill
TypeFounding treaty
Signed25 March 1957
LocationCapitoline Hill in Rome, Italy
Effective1 January 1958
PartiesEU member states
DepositaryGovernment of Italy
Treaty establishing the European Economic Community at Wikisource
Flag of Europe.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
the European Union
Flag of Europe.svg European Union portal

The Treaty of Rome, officially the Treaty establishing the European Economic Community (or EEC Treaty in short) brought about the creation of the European Economic Community (EEC), the best-known of the European Communities (EC). It was signed on 25 March 1957 by Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and West Germany and came into force on 1 January 1958. Under the name Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, it remains one of the two most important treaties in the modern-day European Union (EU).

The TEEC proposed the progressive reduction of customs duties and the establishment of a customs union. It proposed to create a single market for goods, labour, services, and capital across the EEC's member states. It also proposed the creation of a Common Agriculture Policy, a Common Transport Policy and a European Social Fund, and established the European Commission.

The treaty has been amended on several occasions since 1957. The Maastricht Treaty of 1992 removed the word "economic" from the Treaty of Rome's official title and, in 2009, the Treaty of Lisbon renamed it the "Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union".