Swiss franc

  • swiss franc
    schweizer franken (german)
    franc suisse (french)
    franco svizzero (italian)
    franc svizzer (romansh)
    chf 1000 9 front.jpg chf coins.jpg
    banknotescoins
    iso 4217
    codechf
    number756
    exponent2
    denominations
    subunit
     ​1100rappen  (german)
    centime  (french)
    centesimo  (italian)
    rap  (romansh)
    pluralfranken  (german)
    francs  (french)
    franchi  (italian)
    francs  (romansh)
    rappen  (german)
    centime  (french)
    centesimo  (italian)
    rap  (romansh)
    rappen  (german)
    centimes  (french)
    centesimi  (italian)
    raps  (romansh)
    symbolgerman: fr., rp.[1][2]
    french: fr., c.[1][3]
    italian: fr., ct.[1][4]
    romansh: fr., rp.[1]
    international (any other language): chf[1][5]
    nickname
    • gsw: räppli[note 1] for a 1 centime coin; füüferli[note 1] for a 5 centimes coin; füfzgerli[note 1] for a 50 centimes coin; stutz[note 1] for a 1 franc coin (en stutz), or change in general (stutz); füüfliiber[note 1] for a 5 francs coin
    • de: einfränkler for a 1 franc coin; zweifränkler for a 2 francs coin; hunderter for a 100 francs note; ameise for a 1000 francs note
    • fr: balle(s) for ≥ 1 franc; thune for a 5 francs coin
    • it:
    banknotes10, 20, 50, 100, 200 & 1,000 francs
    coins5, 10 & 20 centimes, ​12, 1, 2 & 5 francs
    demographics
    official user(s)  switzerland
     liechtenstein
    italy campione d'italia, italy[note 2]
    unofficial user(s)germany büsingen am hochrhein, germany[note 3]
    issuance
    central bankwww.snb.ch
    printerorell füssli arts graphiques sa (zürich)
    mintwww.swissmint.ch
    valuation
    statistik schweiz

    the franc (german: franken, french and romansh: franc, italian: franco; sign: fr. (in german language), fr. (in french, italian, romansh languages), or chf in any other language, or internationally;[1] code: chf) is the currency and legal tender of switzerland and liechtenstein; it is also legal tender in the italian exclave of campione d'italia. the swiss national bank (snb) issues banknotes and the federal mint swissmint issues coins.

    the smaller denomination, a hundredth of a franc, is a rappen (rp.) in german, centime (c.) in french, centesimo (ct.) in italian, and rap (rp.) in romansh. the iso 4217 code of the currency used by banks and financial institutions is chf.

    the official symbols fr. (german symbol) and fr. (latin languages) are widely used by businesses and advertisers, also for the english language. according art. 1 sr/rs 941.101 of the federal law collection the internationally official abbreviation – besides the national languages – however is chf,[1] also in english; respective guides also request to use the iso 4217 code.[5][2][3][4] outdated is the use of sfr. for swiss franc and fr.sv..[2][3][4] the latinate “ch” stands for confoederatio helvetica. given the different languages used in switzerland, latin is used for language-neutral inscriptions on its coins.

  • history
  • coins
  • banknotes
  • circulation
  • current exchange rates
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Swiss franc
Schweizer Franken (German)
franc suisse (French)
franco svizzero (Italian)
franc svizzer (Romansh)
CHF 1000 9 front.jpg CHF coins.jpg
BanknotesCoins
ISO 4217
CodeCHF
Number756
Exponent2
Denominations
Subunit
 ​1100Rappen  (German)
centime  (French)
centesimo  (Italian)
rap  (Romansh)
PluralFranken  (German)
francs  (French)
franchi  (Italian)
francs  (Romansh)
Rappen  (German)
centime  (French)
centesimo  (Italian)
rap  (Romansh)
Rappen  (German)
centimes  (French)
centesimi  (Italian)
raps  (Romansh)
SymbolGerman: Fr., Rp.[1][2]
French: fr., c.[1][3]
Italian: fr., ct.[1][4]
Romansh: fr., rp.[1]
International (any other language): CHF[1][5]
Nickname
  • gsw: Räppli[note 1] for a 1 centime coin; Füüferli[note 1] for a 5 centimes coin; Füfzgerli[note 1] for a 50 centimes coin; Stutz[note 1] for a 1 franc coin (en Stutz), or change in general (Stutz); Füüfliiber[note 1] for a 5 francs coin
  • de: Einfränkler for a 1 franc coin; Zweifränkler for a 2 francs coin; Hunderter for a 100 francs note; Ameise for a 1000 francs note
  • fr: balle(s) for ≥ 1 franc; thune for a 5 francs coin
  • it:
Banknotes10, 20, 50, 100, 200 & 1,000 francs
Coins5, 10 & 20 centimes, ​12, 1, 2 & 5 francs
Demographics
Official user(s)  Switzerland
 Liechtenstein
Italy Campione d'Italia, Italy[note 2]
Unofficial user(s)Germany Büsingen am Hochrhein, Germany[note 3]
Issuance
Central bankwww.snb.ch
PrinterOrell Füssli Arts Graphiques SA (Zürich)
Mintwww.swissmint.ch
Valuation
Statistik Schweiz

The franc (German: Franken, French and Romansh: franc, Italian: franco; sign: Fr. (in German language), fr. (in French, Italian, Romansh languages), or CHF in any other language, or internationally;[1] code: CHF) is the currency and legal tender of Switzerland and Liechtenstein; it is also legal tender in the Italian exclave of Campione d'Italia. The Swiss National Bank (SNB) issues banknotes and the federal mint Swissmint issues coins.

The smaller denomination, a hundredth of a franc, is a Rappen (Rp.) in German, centime (c.) in French, centesimo (ct.) in Italian, and rap (rp.) in Romansh. The ISO 4217 code of the currency used by banks and financial institutions is CHF.

The official symbols Fr. (German symbol) and fr. (Latin languages) are widely used by businesses and advertisers, also for the English language. According Art. 1 SR/RS 941.101 of the federal law collection the internationally official abbreviation – besides the national languages – however is CHF,[1] also in English; respective guides also request to use the ISO 4217 code.[5][2][3][4] Outdated is the use of SFr. for Swiss Franc and fr.sv..[2][3][4] The Latinate “CH” stands for Confoederatio Helvetica. Given the different languages used in Switzerland, Latin is used for language-neutral inscriptions on its coins.