Spanish naming customs

  • spanish naming customs are historical traditions for naming children practised in spain. according to these customs, a person's name consists of a given name (simple or composite) followed by two surnames. historically, the first surname was the father's first surname, and the second the mother's first surname. in recent years, the order of the surnames in a family is decided when registering the first child, but the traditional order is still largely the choice.[1] often, the practice is to use one given name and the first surname most of the time (e.g. "miguel de unamuno" for miguel de unamuno y jugo), the complete name being typically reserved for legal, formal, and documentary matters; however, both surnames are sometimes systematically used when the first surname is very common (e.g., federico garcía lorca, pablo ruiz picasso or josé luis rodríguez zapatero) to get a more customized name.[2] in these cases, it is even common to use only the second surname, as in "lorca", "picasso" or "zapatero". this does not affect alphabetization: discussions of "lorca", the spanish poet, must be alphabetized in an index under "garcía lorca" and not "lorca".

  • naming system in spain
  • nominal conjunctions
  • denotations
  • spain's other languages
  • indexing
  • see also
  • notes and references
  • external links

Spanish naming customs are historical traditions for naming children practised in Spain. According to these customs, a person's name consists of a given name (simple or composite) followed by two surnames. Historically, the first surname was the father's first surname, and the second the mother's first surname. In recent years, the order of the surnames in a family is decided when registering the first child, but the traditional order is still largely the choice.[1] Often, the practice is to use one given name and the first surname most of the time (e.g. "Miguel de Unamuno" for Miguel de Unamuno y Jugo), the complete name being typically reserved for legal, formal, and documentary matters; however, both surnames are sometimes systematically used when the first surname is very common (e.g., Federico García Lorca, Pablo Ruiz Picasso or José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero) to get a more customized name.[2] In these cases, it is even common to use only the second surname, as in "Lorca", "Picasso" or "Zapatero". This does not affect alphabetization: discussions of "Lorca", the Spanish poet, must be alphabetized in an index under "García Lorca" and not "Lorca".