Permanent residency

  • sample of a 2017 permanent resident card (green card) of the united states, which permits its holder to live and work anywhere in the country similar to that of all other americans. before a person is naturalized as a u.s. citizen, they must be a green card holder for at least 5 years and satisfy all other naturalization requirements.[1][2]

    permanent residency is a person's resident status in a country of which they are not citizens but where they have the right to reside on a permanent basis. this is usually for a permanent period; a person with such status is known as a permanent resident. in the united states, such a person is officially referred to as a lawful permanent resident (lpr).[1]

    permanent residency itself is distinct from right of abode, which waives immigration control for such persons. persons having permanent residency still require immigration control if they do not have right of abode. however, a right of abode automatically grants people permanent residency. this status also gives work permit in most cases.[1] in many western countries, the status of permanent resident confers a right of abode upon the holder despite not being a citizen of the particular country.

  • countries with permanent residency systems
  • limitations of permanent residents
  • obligations of permanent residents
  • loss of status
  • access to citizenship
  • automatic entitlement
  • proof of permanent residency
  • brexit
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

Sample of a 2017 permanent resident card (green card) of the United States, which permits its holder to live and work anywhere in the country similar to that of all other Americans. Before a person is naturalized as a U.S. citizen, they must be a green card holder for at least 5 years and satisfy all other naturalization requirements.[1][2]

Permanent residency is a person's resident status in a country of which they are not citizens but where they have the right to reside on a permanent basis. This is usually for a permanent period; a person with such status is known as a permanent resident. In the United States, such a person is officially referred to as a Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR).[1]

Permanent residency itself is distinct from right of abode, which waives immigration control for such persons. Persons having permanent residency still require immigration control if they do not have right of abode. However, a right of abode automatically grants people permanent residency. This status also gives work permit in most cases.[1] In many western countries, the status of permanent resident confers a right of abode upon the holder despite not being a citizen of the particular country.