Party of Democratic Socialism (Germany)

  • party of democratic socialism

    partei des demokratischen sozialismus / die linkspartei.pds
    leaderlothar bisky
    founded16 december 1989 (sed-pds)
    4 february 1990 (pds)
    17 july 2005 (die linkspartei/pds)
    dissolved16 january 2007
    preceded bysocialist unity party of germany (sed)
    merged intothe left
    headquarterskarl-liebknecht-haus
    kleine alexanderstraße 28
    d-10178 berlin
    newspapernone
    ideologydemocratic socialism
    left-wing populism[1]
    political positionleft-wing
    european affiliationparty of the european left
    european parliament groupwww.sozialisten.de
    • politics of germany
    • political parties
    • elections

    the party of democratic socialism (german: partei des demokratischen sozialismus, pds) was a democratic socialist political party in germany active between 1989 and 2007.[2] it was the legal successor to the socialist unity party of germany (sed), which ruled the german democratic republic (east germany) as a state party until 1990.[3] from 1990 through to 2005, the pds had been seen as the left-wing "party of the east". while it achieved minimal support in western germany, it regularly won 15% to 25% of the vote in the eastern new states of germany, entering coalition governments (with the social democratic party of germany, spd) in the federal states of mecklenburg-vorpommern and berlin.[4]

    in 2005, the pds, renamed the left party.pds (die linkspartei.pds) entered an electoral alliance with the western germany-based electoral alternative for labour and social justice (wasg) and won 8.7% of the vote in germany's september 2005 federal elections (more than double the 4% share achieved by the pds alone in the 2002 federal election). on 16 june 2007, the two groupings merged to form a new party called the left (die linke).[5]

    the party had many socially progressive policies, including support for legalisation of same-sex marriage and greater social welfare for immigrants.[6]

    internationally, the left party.pds was a co-founder of the party of the european left and was the largest party in the european united left–nordic green left (gue/ngl) group in the european parliament.[7]

  • background
  • in state and local government
  • in federal elections
  • controversies
  • election results
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Party of Democratic Socialism

Partei des Demokratischen Sozialismus / Die Linkspartei.PDS
LeaderLothar Bisky
Founded16 December 1989 (SED-PDS)
4 February 1990 (PDS)
17 July 2005 (Die Linkspartei/PDS)
Dissolved16 January 2007
Preceded bySocialist Unity Party of Germany (SED)
Merged intoThe Left
HeadquartersKarl-Liebknecht-Haus
Kleine Alexanderstraße 28
D-10178 Berlin
NewspaperNone
IdeologyDemocratic socialism
Left-wing populism[1]
Political positionLeft-wing
European affiliationParty of the European Left
European Parliament groupwww.sozialisten.de

The Party of Democratic Socialism (German: Partei des Demokratischen Sozialismus, PDS) was a democratic socialist political party in Germany active between 1989 and 2007.[2] It was the legal successor to the Socialist Unity Party of Germany (SED), which ruled the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) as a state party until 1990.[3] From 1990 through to 2005, the PDS had been seen as the left-wing "party of the East". While it achieved minimal support in western Germany, it regularly won 15% to 25% of the vote in the eastern new states of Germany, entering coalition governments (with the Social Democratic Party of Germany, SPD) in the federal states of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Berlin.[4]

In 2005, the PDS, renamed The Left Party.PDS (Die Linkspartei.PDS) entered an electoral alliance with the Western Germany-based Electoral Alternative for Labour and Social Justice (WASG) and won 8.7% of the vote in Germany's September 2005 federal elections (more than double the 4% share achieved by the PDS alone in the 2002 federal election). On 16 June 2007, the two groupings merged to form a new party called The Left (Die Linke).[5]

The party had many socially progressive policies, including support for legalisation of same-sex marriage and greater social welfare for immigrants.[6]

Internationally, the Left Party.PDS was a co-founder of the Party of the European Left and was the largest party in the European United Left–Nordic Green Left (GUE/NGL) group in the European Parliament.[7]