Musical composition

  • scherzo in a flat by the russian romantic era composer alexander borodin (1833–1887) about this soundplay 
    jazz, rock and pop songwriters typically write out newly composed songs in a lead sheet, which notates the melody, the chord progression, and the tempo or style of the song (e.g., "slow blues").
    jazz and rock genre musicians may memorize the melodies for a new song, which means that they only need to provide a chord chart to guide improvising musicians. about this soundplay 

    musical composition, music composition, or simply composition, can refer to an original piece or work of music,[1] either vocal or instrumental, the structure of a musical piece, or to the process of creating or writing a new piece of music. people who create new compositions are called composers. composers of primarily songs are usually called songwriters;[2][3] with songs, the person who writes lyrics for a song is the lyricist. in many cultures, including western classical music, the act of composing typically includes the creation of music notation, such as a sheet music "score," which is then performed by the composer or by other musicians. in popular music and traditional music, songwriting may involve the creation of a basic outline of the song, called the lead sheet, which sets out the melody, lyrics and chord progression. in classical music, orchestration (choosing the instruments of a large music ensemble such as an orchestra which will play the different parts of music, such as the melody, accompaniment, countermelody, bassline and so on) is typically done by the composer, but in musical theatre and in pop music, songwriters may hire an arranger to do the orchestration. in some cases, a pop or traditional songwriter may not use written notation at all, and instead compose the song in their mind and then play, sing or record it from memory. in jazz and popular music, notable sound recordings by influential performers are given the weight that written or printed scores play in classical music.

    although a musical composition often uses musical notation and has a single author, this is not always the case. a work of music can have multiple composers, which often occurs in popular music when all members of a band collaborate to write a song, or in musical theatre, when one person writes the melodies, a second person writes the lyrics, and a third person orchestrates the songs. a piece of music can also be composed with words, images, or, since the 20th century, with computer programs that explain or notate how the singer or musician should create musical sounds. examples range from 20th century avant-garde music that uses graphic notation, to text compositions such as karlheinz stockhausen's aus den sieben tagen, to computer programs that select sounds for musical pieces. music that makes heavy use of randomness and chance is called aleatoric music, and is associated with contemporary composers active in the 20th century, such as john cage, morton feldman, and witold lutosławski. a more commonly known example of chance-based music is the sound of wind chimes jingling in a breeze. the study of composition has traditionally been dominated by examination of methods and practice of western classical music, but the definition of composition is broad enough to include the creation of popular music and traditional music songs and instrumental pieces, and to include spontaneously improvised works like those of free jazz performers and african percussionists such as ewe drummers.

    although in the 2000s, composition is considered to consist of the manipulation of each aspect of music (harmony, melody, form, rhythm, and timbre), according to jean-benjamin de laborde (1780, 2:12):

    composition consists in two things only. the first is the ordering and disposing of several sounds...in such a manner that their succession pleases the ear. this is what the ancients called melody. the second is the rendering audible of two or more simultaneous sounds in such a manner that their combination is pleasant. this is what we call harmony, and it alone merits the name of composition.[4]

  • terminology
  • as a musical form
  • methods
  • compositional instrumentation
  • arranging
  • interpretation
  • copyright and legal status
  • see also
  • references
  • sources
  • further reading
  • external links

Scherzo in A flat by the Russian Romantic era composer Alexander Borodin (1833–1887) About this soundPlay 
Jazz, rock and pop songwriters typically write out newly composed songs in a lead sheet, which notates the melody, the chord progression, and the tempo or style of the song (e.g., "slow blues").
Jazz and rock genre musicians may memorize the melodies for a new song, which means that they only need to provide a chord chart to guide improvising musicians. About this soundPlay 

Musical composition, music composition, or simply composition, can refer to an original piece or work of music,[1] either vocal or instrumental, the structure of a musical piece, or to the process of creating or writing a new piece of music. People who create new compositions are called composers. Composers of primarily songs are usually called songwriters;[2][3] with songs, the person who writes lyrics for a song is the lyricist. In many cultures, including Western classical music, the act of composing typically includes the creation of music notation, such as a sheet music "score," which is then performed by the composer or by other musicians. In popular music and traditional music, songwriting may involve the creation of a basic outline of the song, called the lead sheet, which sets out the melody, lyrics and chord progression. In classical music, orchestration (choosing the instruments of a large music ensemble such as an orchestra which will play the different parts of music, such as the melody, accompaniment, countermelody, bassline and so on) is typically done by the composer, but in musical theatre and in pop music, songwriters may hire an arranger to do the orchestration. In some cases, a pop or traditional songwriter may not use written notation at all, and instead compose the song in their mind and then play, sing or record it from memory. In jazz and popular music, notable sound recordings by influential performers are given the weight that written or printed scores play in classical music.

Although a musical composition often uses musical notation and has a single author, this is not always the case. A work of music can have multiple composers, which often occurs in popular music when all members of a band collaborate to write a song, or in musical theatre, when one person writes the melodies, a second person writes the lyrics, and a third person orchestrates the songs. A piece of music can also be composed with words, images, or, since the 20th century, with computer programs that explain or notate how the singer or musician should create musical sounds. Examples range from 20th century avant-garde music that uses graphic notation, to text compositions such as Karlheinz Stockhausen's Aus den sieben Tagen, to computer programs that select sounds for musical pieces. Music that makes heavy use of randomness and chance is called aleatoric music, and is associated with contemporary composers active in the 20th century, such as John Cage, Morton Feldman, and Witold Lutosławski. A more commonly known example of chance-based music is the sound of wind chimes jingling in a breeze. The study of composition has traditionally been dominated by examination of methods and practice of Western classical music, but the definition of composition is broad enough to include the creation of popular music and traditional music songs and instrumental pieces, and to include spontaneously improvised works like those of free jazz performers and African percussionists such as Ewe drummers.

Although in the 2000s, composition is considered to consist of the manipulation of each aspect of music (harmony, melody, form, rhythm, and timbre), according to Jean-Benjamin de Laborde (1780, 2:12):

Composition consists in two things only. The first is the ordering and disposing of several sounds...in such a manner that their succession pleases the ear. This is what the Ancients called melody. The second is the rendering audible of two or more simultaneous sounds in such a manner that their combination is pleasant. This is what we call harmony, and it alone merits the name of composition.[4]