Marduk

  • marduk and his dragon mušḫuššu, from a babylonian cylinder seal.[1]

    marduk (cuneiform: 𒀭𒀫𒌓 damar.utu; sumerian: amar utu.k "calf of the sun; solar calf"; greek Μαρδοχαῖος,[2] mardochaios; hebrew: מְרֹדַךְ, modern: mərōdaḵ, tiberian: merōḏaḵ) was a late-generation god from ancient mesopotamia and patron deity of the city of babylon. when babylon became the political center of the euphrates valley in the time of hammurabi (18th century bc), he slowly started to rise to the position of the head of the babylonian pantheon, a position he fully acquired by the second half of the second millennium bc. in the city of babylon, marduk was worshiped in the temple esagila. marduk is associated with the divine weapon imhullu. "marduk" is the babylonian form of his name.[3]

    the name marduk was probably pronounced marutuk.[4] the etymology of the name marduk is conjectured as derived from amar-utu ("immortal son of utu" or "bull calf of the sun god utu").[3] the origin of marduk's name may reflect an earlier genealogy, or have had cultural ties to the ancient city of sippar (whose god was utu), dating to the third millennium bc.[5]

    by the hammurabi period, marduk had become astrologically associated with the planet jupiter.[6]

  • background
  • mythology
  • the fifty names of marduk
  • marduk prophecy
  • bel
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • external links

Marduk and his dragon Mušḫuššu, from a Babylonian cylinder seal.[1]

Marduk (Cuneiform: 𒀭𒀫𒌓 dAMAR.UTU; Sumerian: amar utu.k "calf of the sun; solar calf"; Greek Μαρδοχαῖος,[2] Mardochaios; Hebrew: מְרֹדַךְ, Modern: Mərōdaḵ, Tiberian: Merōḏaḵ) was a late-generation god from ancient Mesopotamia and patron deity of the city of Babylon. When Babylon became the political center of the Euphrates valley in the time of Hammurabi (18th century BC), he slowly started to rise to the position of the head of the Babylonian pantheon, a position he fully acquired by the second half of the second millennium BC. In the city of Babylon, Marduk was worshiped in the temple Esagila. Marduk is associated with the divine weapon Imhullu. "Marduk" is the Babylonian form of his name.[3]

The name Marduk was probably pronounced Marutuk.[4] The etymology of the name Marduk is conjectured as derived from amar-Utu ("immortal son of Utu" or "bull calf of the sun god Utu").[3] The origin of Marduk's name may reflect an earlier genealogy, or have had cultural ties to the ancient city of Sippar (whose god was Utu), dating to the third millennium BC.[5]

By the Hammurabi period, Marduk had become astrologically associated with the planet Jupiter.[6]