Manchester Metropolitan University

Manchester Metropolitan University
Manchester Metropolitan University logo.svg
Former name
Manchester Polytechnic
TypePublic
Established1843 - Manchester School of Design
1970 - Manchester Polytechnic
1992 - gained university status as Manchester Metropolitan University
Endowment£1.0 m (2015)[1]
ChancellorPeter Mandelson[2]
Vice-ChancellorMalcolm Press[3]
Students33,010 (2016/17)[4]
Undergraduates26,780 (2016/17)[4]
Postgraduates6,235 (2016/17)[4]
Other students
200 FE[5]
Location,
England, UK

53.47053, −2.23872
CampusAll Saints, Birley Fields
AffiliationsUniversity Alliance
Association of Commonwealth Universities
NWUA
Association of MBAs
www.mmu.ac.uk

Manchester Metropolitan University (often abbreviated MMU) is a public university located in Manchester, England. The university traces its origins to the Manchester Mechanics Institute[6] - later the Manchester College of Commerce - and the Manchester School of Design, which formed Manchester Polytechnic in 1970. Manchester Polytechnic then gained university status under the government's Further and Higher Education Act, becoming the Manchester Metropolitan University in 1992. Today, it is headquartered in the city of Manchester, with additional facilities in Cheshire.

Manchester Metropolitan University is an accredited member of the Association of MBAs, and member of the University Alliance, the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the North West Universities Association, Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business and the European University Association.

Today, it is also home to the Manchester School of Art, the Manchester School of Theatre, as well as the Manchester School of Architecture (MSA) administered in collaboration with the University of Manchester.

The University's logo is derived from the upper part of the shield of the university crest, with six spade-irons positioned together, suggesting hard toil and entrenchment.

History

Manchester Met was developed from mergers of various colleges with various specialisms, including technology, art and design. Its founding can be traced back to the Manchester Mechanics Institute,[6] and the Manchester School of Design latterly known as the Manchester School of Art. The painter L. S. Lowry attended in the years after the First World War, where he was taught by the noted impressionist Adolphe Valette.[6]

Schools of Commerce (founded 1889), Education (f. 1878), and Domestic Science (f. 1880) were added alongside colleges at Didsbury, Crewe, Alsager and the former Domestic and Trades College (f. 1911). The school renamed itself as Manchester Polytechnic in 1970, which was followed by series of mergers with the Didsbury College of Education and Hollings College in 1977, as well as City of Manchester College of Higher Education in 1983. In 1987, the institution became a founding member of the Northern Consortium, and became a corporate body on 1 April 1989 as allowed by the terms of the Education Reform Act.

On 15 September 1992, Manchester Polytechnic finally gained university status under the wide-sweeping Further and Higher Education Act 1992, and has since rebranded as Manchester Metropolitan University.

After earning university status, Manchester Met absorbed Crewe and Alsager College of Higher Education, and the Manchester School of Physiotherapy (MSOP) in 2004: an institution officially formed in 1991 through the amalgamation of the Manchester Royal Infirmary (M.R.I.) and Withington Hospital Schools of Physiotherapy.[7] MSOP was previously affiliated with the Victoria University of Manchester, which conferred degree-level courses by extension until the final Class of 2005.[8] MSOP joined Manchester Metropolitan University as the Department of Physiotherapy in 2004, and was later renamed as the Department of Health Professions. Today, it offers undergraduate and postgraduate studies, a three-year undergraduate honours programme, and National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) programmes for unqualified support workers in the field of physiotherapy.[7]

Ormond Building