Hindu denominations

  • hindu denominations are traditions within hinduism centered on one or more gods or goddesses, such as shiva, vishnu and brahma.[1] sometimes the term is used for sampradayas led by a particular guru with a particular philosophy.[2]

    hinduism has no central doctrinal authority and many practising hindus do not claim to belong to any particular denomination or tradition.[3] four major traditions are, however, used in scholarly studies: vaishnavism, shaivism, shaktism and smartism.[1][4][5] these are sometimes referred to as the denominations of hinduism, and they differ in the primary deity at the centre of the tradition.[6] a notable feature of hindu denominations is that they do not deny other concepts of the divine or deity, and often celebrate the other as henotheistic equivalent.[7] the denominations of hinduism, states lipner, are unlike those found in major religions of the world, because hindu denominations are fuzzy with individuals practising more than one, and he suggests the term "hindu polycentrism".[8]

    although hinduism contains many denominations and philosophies, it is linked by shared concepts, recognisable rituals, cosmology, shared textual resources, pilgrimage to sacred sites and the questioning of authority.[9]

  • typology
  • folk hinduism
  • main denominations
  • other denominations
  • demography
  • cross-denominational influences
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • sources
  • external links

Hindu denominations are traditions within Hinduism centered on one or more gods or goddesses, such as Shiva, Vishnu and Brahma.[1] Sometimes the term is used for sampradayas led by a particular guru with a particular philosophy.[2]

Hinduism has no central doctrinal authority and many practising Hindus do not claim to belong to any particular denomination or tradition.[3] Four major traditions are, however, used in scholarly studies: Vaishnavism, Shaivism, Shaktism and Smartism.[1][4][5] These are sometimes referred to as the denominations of Hinduism, and they differ in the primary deity at the centre of the tradition.[6] A notable feature of Hindu denominations is that they do not deny other concepts of the divine or deity, and often celebrate the other as henotheistic equivalent.[7] The denominations of Hinduism, states Lipner, are unlike those found in major religions of the world, because Hindu denominations are fuzzy with individuals practising more than one, and he suggests the term "Hindu polycentrism".[8]

Although Hinduism contains many denominations and philosophies, it is linked by shared concepts, recognisable rituals, cosmology, shared textual resources, pilgrimage to sacred sites and the questioning of authority.[9]