Hepatitis D

  • hepatitis d
    other nameshepatitis delta
    specialtyinfectious disease edit this on wikidata
    symptomsfeeling tired, nausea and vomiting[1]
    complicationscirrhosis[1]
    causeshepatitis d virus[1]
    diagnostic methodimmunoglobulin g[2]
    treatmentpegylated interferon alpha[2]

    hepatitis d is a disease caused by the hepatitis delta virus (hdv), a small spherical enveloped virusoid.[3] this is one of five known hepatitis viruses: a, b, c, d, and e. hdv is considered to be a subviral satellite because it can propagate only in the presence of the hepatitis b virus (hbv).[4] transmission of hdv can occur either via simultaneous infection with hbv (coinfection) or superimposed on chronic hepatitis b or hepatitis b carrier state (superinfection).

    both superinfection and coinfection with hdv result in more severe complications compared to infection with hbv alone. these complications include a greater likelihood of experiencing liver failure in acute infections and a rapid progression to liver cirrhosis, with an increased risk of developing liver cancer in chronic infections.[5] in combination with hepatitis b virus, hepatitis d has the highest fatality rate of all the hepatitis infections, at 20%.

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Hepatitis D
Other namesHepatitis delta
SpecialtyInfectious disease Edit this on Wikidata
SymptomsFeeling tired, nausea and vomiting[1]
ComplicationsCirrhosis[1]
CausesHepatitis D virus[1]
Diagnostic methodImmunoglobulin G[2]
TreatmentPegylated interferon alpha[2]

Hepatitis D is a disease caused by the hepatitis delta virus (HDV), a small spherical enveloped virusoid.[3] This is one of five known hepatitis viruses: A, B, C, D, and E. HDV is considered to be a subviral satellite because it can propagate only in the presence of the hepatitis B virus (HBV).[4] Transmission of HDV can occur either via simultaneous infection with HBV (coinfection) or superimposed on chronic hepatitis B or hepatitis B carrier state (superinfection).

Both superinfection and coinfection with HDV result in more severe complications compared to infection with HBV alone. These complications include a greater likelihood of experiencing liver failure in acute infections and a rapid progression to liver cirrhosis, with an increased risk of developing liver cancer in chronic infections.[5] In combination with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis D has the highest fatality rate of all the hepatitis infections, at 20%.