Eskimo

  • eskimo
    inuit conf map.png
    map of the inuit circumpolar council of eskimo peoples, showing the yupik (yup'ik, siberian yupik) and inuit (iñupiat, inuvialuit, nunavut, nunavik, nunatsiavut, greenlandic inuit)
    total population
    170,500
    regions with significant populations
    russia
    - chukotka autonomous okrug
    - sakha (yakutia)

    united states
    - alaska

    canada
    - newfoundland and labrador
    - northwest territories
    - nunavut
    - quebec
    - yukon (formerly)

    denmark
    - greenland
    languages
    russian, english, french, danish, greenlandic and other eskimo–aleut languages.
    religion
    christianity (russian orthodox church, orthodox church in america, roman catholicism, anglican church of canada, church of denmark),
    animism
    related ethnic groups
    aleut
    external video
    eskimo hunters in alaska - the traditional inuit way of life 1949 documentary on native americans

    eskimo (/ ess-kih-moh) or eskimos are the indigenous circumpolar peoples who have traditionally inhabited the northern circumpolar region from eastern siberia (russia) to alaska (of the united states), canada, and greenland.[1][2] the two main peoples known as "eskimo" are the inuit—including the alaskan iñupiat peoples, the greenlandic inuit, and the mass-grouping inuit peoples of canada—and the yupik of eastern siberia[3] and alaska. a third northern group, the aleut, is closely related to both. they share a relatively recent common ancestor and a language group (eskimo-aleut). the chukchi people, from siberia, are also the closest living relatives of inuit, and yupik people.

    the non-inuit sub-branch of the eskimo branch of the eskimo-aleut language family consists of four distinct yupik languages, two used in the russian far east and st. lawrence island, and two used in western alaska, southwestern alaska, and the western part of southcentral alaska. the extinct language of the sirenik people is sometimes argued to be related to these.

    the lingual origin of "eskimo" comes from the montagnais word for "snowshoe-netter" according to scholars at the smithsonian institution.[4] the governments in canada[5] and greenland[citation needed] have ceased using it in official documents.

  • description
  • history
  • nomenclature
  • languages
  • inuit
  • yupik
  • sirenik eskimos
  • see also
  • references
  • sources
  • further reading

Eskimo
Inuit conf map.png
Total population
170,500
Regions with significant populations
Russia
- Chukotka Autonomous Okrug
- Sakha (Yakutia)

United States
- Alaska

Canada
- Newfoundland and Labrador
- Northwest Territories
- Nunavut
- Quebec
- Yukon (formerly)

Denmark
- Greenland
Languages
Russian, English, French, Danish, Greenlandic and other Eskimo–Aleut languages.
Religion
Christianity (Russian Orthodox Church, Orthodox Church in America, Roman Catholicism, Anglican Church of Canada, Church of Denmark),
Animism
Related ethnic groups
Aleut
External video
Eskimo Hunters in Alaska - The Traditional Inuit Way of Life 1949 Documentary on Native Americans

Eskimo (/ ESS-kih-moh) or Eskimos are the indigenous circumpolar peoples who have traditionally inhabited the northern circumpolar region from eastern Siberia (Russia) to Alaska (of the United States), Canada, and Greenland.[1][2] The two main peoples known as "Eskimo" are the Inuit—including the Alaskan Iñupiat peoples, the Greenlandic Inuit, and the mass-grouping Inuit peoples of Canada—and the Yupik of eastern Siberia[3] and Alaska. A third northern group, the Aleut, is closely related to both. They share a relatively recent common ancestor and a language group (Eskimo-Aleut). The Chukchi People, from Siberia, are also the closest living relatives of Inuit, and Yupik people.

The non-Inuit sub-branch of the Eskimo branch of the Eskimo-Aleut language family consists of four distinct Yupik languages, two used in the Russian Far East and St. Lawrence Island, and two used in western Alaska, southwestern Alaska, and the western part of Southcentral Alaska. The extinct language of the Sirenik people is sometimes argued to be related to these.

The lingual origin of "Eskimo" comes from the Montagnais word for "snowshoe-netter" according to scholars at the Smithsonian Institution.[4] The governments in Canada[5] and Greenland[citation needed] have ceased using it in official documents.