Egypt (Roman province)

  • roman province of egypt
    provincia aegypti  (latin)
    Ἐπαρχία Αἰγύπτου
    eparchía aigýptou  (ancient greek)
    province of the roman empire
    30 bc–619 ad;
    629 ad–641 ad
    roman empire - aegyptus (125 ad).svg
    province of aegyptus in ad 125.
    capitalalexandria
    historical eraclassic antiquity
    • conquest of ptolemaic kingdom
    30 bc
    • formation of the diocese
    390
    • muslim conquest
    641
    preceded by
    succeeded by
    ptolemaic kingdom
    sasanian egypt
    rashidun caliphate
    today part ofegypt

    the roman province of egypt (latin: aegyptus, pronounced [ae̯ˈɡʏptʊs]; hellenistic greek: Αἴγυπτος, romanized: aígyptos, pronounced [ɛ́ːɡyptos]) was established in 30 bc after octavian (the future roman emperor augustus) defeated his rival mark antony, deposed pharaoh cleopatra, and annexed the ptolemaic kingdom to the roman empire. the province encompassed most of modern-day egypt except for the sinai peninsula (which would later be conquered by trajan). aegyptus was bordered by the provinces of crete and cyrenaica to the west and judea (later arabia petraea) to the east.

    the province came to serve as a major producer of grain for the empire and had a highly developed urban economy. aegyptus was by far the wealthiest eastern roman province,[1][2] and by far the wealthiest roman province outside of italia.[3] in alexandria, its capital, it possessed the largest port, and the second largest city of the roman empire.

    the population of roman egypt is unknown; estimates vary from 4 to 8 million.[4]

  • roman rule in egypt
  • roman government in egypt
  • economy
  • military
  • social structure in early roman egypt
  • christian egypt (33 ad–4th century)
  • later roman egypt (4th–6th centuries)
  • episcopal sees
  • sassanian persian invasion (619 ad)
  • arab islamic conquest (639–646 ad)
  • gallery
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Roman province of Egypt
Provincia Aegypti  (Latin)
Ἐπαρχία Αἰγύπτου
Eparchía Aigýptou  (Ancient Greek)
Province of the Roman Empire
30 BC–619 AD;
629 AD–641 AD
Roman Empire - Aegyptus (125 AD).svg
Province of Aegyptus in AD 125.
CapitalAlexandria
Historical eraClassic antiquity
• Conquest of Ptolemaic Kingdom
30 BC
• Formation of the Diocese
390
641
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Ptolemaic Kingdom
Sasanian Egypt
Rashidun Caliphate
Today part ofEgypt

The Roman province of Egypt (Latin: Aegyptus, pronounced [ae̯ˈɡʏptʊs]; Hellenistic Greek: Αἴγυπτος, romanized: Aígyptos, pronounced [ɛ́ːɡyptos]) was established in 30 BC after Octavian (the future Roman emperor Augustus) defeated his rival Mark Antony, deposed Pharaoh Cleopatra, and annexed the Ptolemaic Kingdom to the Roman Empire. The province encompassed most of modern-day Egypt except for the Sinai Peninsula (which would later be conquered by Trajan). Aegyptus was bordered by the provinces of Crete and Cyrenaica to the west and Judea (later Arabia Petraea) to the East.

The province came to serve as a major producer of grain for the empire and had a highly developed urban economy. Aegyptus was by far the wealthiest Eastern Roman province,[1][2] and by far the wealthiest Roman province outside of Italia.[3] In Alexandria, its capital, it possessed the largest port, and the second largest city of the Roman Empire.

The population of Roman Egypt is unknown; estimates vary from 4 to 8 million.[4]