Edict of Fontainebleau

  • plaque commemorating edict of nantes

    the edict of fontainebleau (22 october 1685) was an edict issued by louis xiv of france, also known as the revocation of the edict of nantes. the edict of nantes (1598) had granted the huguenots the right to practice their religion without persecution from the state. though protestants had lost their independence in places of refuge under richelieu on account of their supposed insubordination, they continued to live in comparative security and political contentment. from the outset, religious toleration in france had been a royal, rather than a popular policy.[1] the lack of universal adherence to his religion did not sit well with louis xiv's vision of perfected autocracy: "bending all else to his will, louis xiv resented the presence of heretics among his subjects."[attribution needed][2]

  • edict of nantes
  • revocation of the edict of nantes
  • effects of the revocation of the edict of nantes
  • end of the edict of fontainebleau
  • the apology
  • famous huguenots who left france
  • see also
  • references
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Plaque commemorating Edict of Nantes

The Edict of Fontainebleau (22 October 1685) was an edict issued by Louis XIV of France, also known as the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. The Edict of Nantes (1598) had granted the Huguenots the right to practice their religion without persecution from the state. Though Protestants had lost their independence in places of refuge under Richelieu on account of their supposed insubordination, they continued to live in comparative security and political contentment. From the outset, religious toleration in France had been a royal, rather than a popular policy.[1] The lack of universal adherence to his religion did not sit well with Louis XIV's vision of perfected autocracy: "Bending all else to his will, Louis XIV resented the presence of heretics among his subjects."[attribution needed][2]