Dutch Republic

  • republic of the seven united netherlands

    republiek der zeven verenigde nederlanden
    1581–1795
    flag of united provinces
    statenvlag.svg
    flag
    coat of arms of united provinces
    coat of arms
    motto: "unity makes strength"
    anthem: "wilhelmus van nassouwe"

    location of united provinces
    capitalthe hague (de facto)
    common languagesdutch, dutch low saxon, west frisian
    religion
    dutch reformed (state), catholicism, judaism, lutheranism
    governmentfederal republic
    stadtholder 
    • 1581–1584
    william i
    • 1751–1795
    william v
    grand pensionary 
    • 1581–1585
    paulus buys
    • 1653–1672
    johan de witt
    • 1787–1795
    laurens van de spiegel
    legislaturestates general
    • state council
    council of state
    historical eraearly modern period
    • union of utrecht
    23 january 1579
    • act of abjuration
    26 july 1581
    • vranck deduction
    12 april 1588
    • peace of münster
    30 january 1648
    • batavian revolution
    19 january 1795
    population
    • 1795
    1,880,500[1]
    currencyguilder, rijksdaalder
    preceded by
    succeeded by
    spanish netherlands
    batavian republic
    today part of netherlands
     belgium

    the united provinces of the netherlands, or simply united provinces (officially the republic of the seven united netherlands), and commonly referred to historiographically as the dutch republic, was a federal republic formally established from the formal creation of a federal state in 1581 by several dutch provinces—seceded from spanish rule—until the batavian revolution of 1795. it was a predecessor state of the netherlands and the first fully independent dutch nation state.

    the small republic of around 1.5 million inhabitants distinguished itself by world trade through the dutch east india company (voc) and the dutch west india company (wic), by its great military successes against ostensibly stronger countries such as spain and england, by its huge fleet (with 2,000 ships, larger than that of england and france combined), by the flourishing of arts (painters such as rembrandt, johannes vermeer and many others) and sciences (including hugo grotius and antonie van leeuwenhoek), and by its relatively tolerant atmosphere towards different religions and ideas (freedom of thought). because dutch trade, science, military, and art were among the most acclaimed in the world during much of the 17th century, this period became known in dutch history as the dutch golden age.

  • history
  • economy
  • politics
  • religion
  • decline
  • references
  • external links

Republic of the Seven United Netherlands

Republiek der Zeven Verenigde Nederlanden
1581–1795
Location of United Provinces
CapitalThe Hague (de facto)
Common languagesDutch, Dutch Low Saxon, West Frisian
Religion
Dutch Reformed (state), Catholicism, Judaism, Lutheranism
GovernmentFederal republic
Stadtholder 
• 1581–1584
William I
• 1751–1795
William V
Grand Pensionary 
• 1581–1585
Paulus Buys
• 1653–1672
Johan de Witt
• 1787–1795
Laurens van de Spiegel
LegislatureStates General
• State council
Council of State
Historical eraEarly modern period
23 January 1579
26 July 1581
12 April 1588
30 January 1648
19 January 1795
Population
• 1795
1,880,500[1]
CurrencyGuilder, rijksdaalder
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Spanish Netherlands
Batavian Republic
Today part of Netherlands
 Belgium

The United Provinces of the Netherlands, or simply United Provinces (officially the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands), and commonly referred to historiographically as the Dutch Republic, was a federal republic formally established from the formal creation of a federal state in 1581 by several Dutch provinces—seceded from Spanish rule—until the Batavian Revolution of 1795. It was a predecessor state of the Netherlands and the first fully independent Dutch nation state.

The small republic of around 1.5 million inhabitants distinguished itself by world trade through the Dutch East India Company (VOC) and the Dutch West India Company (WIC), by its great military successes against ostensibly stronger countries such as Spain and England, by its huge fleet (with 2,000 ships, larger than that of England and France combined), by the flourishing of arts (painters such as Rembrandt, Johannes Vermeer and many others) and sciences (including Hugo Grotius and Antonie van Leeuwenhoek), and by its relatively tolerant atmosphere towards different religions and ideas (freedom of thought). Because Dutch trade, science, military, and art were among the most acclaimed in the world during much of the 17th century, this period became known in Dutch history as the Dutch Golden Age.