Derogation

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    derogation is the partial suppression of a law,[1] as opposed to abrogation—total abolition of a law by explicit repeal—and obrogation—the partial or total modification or repeal of a law by the imposition of a later and contrary one. the term is used in canon law,[1] civil law, and common law. it is sometimes used, loosely, to mean abrogation, as in the legal maxim: lex posterior derogat priori, i.e. a subsequent law imparts the abolition of a previous one.

    derogation differs from dispensation in that it applies to the law, whereas dispensation applies to specific people affected by the law.

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Scale of justice
Part of a series on the
Canon law of the
Catholic Church
046CupolaSPietro.jpg Catholicism portal

Derogation is the partial suppression of a law,[1] as opposed to abrogation—total abolition of a law by explicit repeal—and obrogation—the partial or total modification or repeal of a law by the imposition of a later and contrary one. The term is used in canon law,[1] civil law, and common law. It is sometimes used, loosely, to mean abrogation, as in the legal maxim: Lex posterior derogat priori, i.e. a subsequent law imparts the abolition of a previous one.

Derogation differs from dispensation in that it applies to the law, whereas dispensation applies to specific people affected by the law.