Commerce

  • portrait of 16th century merchant georg gisze

    commerce is the exchange of goods and services, especially on a large scale.[1] it includes legal, economic, political, social, cultural and technological systems that operate in a country or in international trade.

    in the economic sense, "commerce" refers to the conduct of trade among economic agents.[2] commerce generally affects the well-being and welfare of citizens and residents, as it is known[by whom?] to directly impact the money which people have and their job opportunities as well. the term "commerce" may also refer to the buying and selling of commodities globally or across borders - between governments and between business firms.[citation needed]

    many[quantify] scholars and ancient philosophers have known[by whom?] to mix up the terms "trade" and "commerce". but in essence these two are distinct terms carrying different meanings:

    • trade, on the one hand, may mean the selling and buying of commodities for money or anything of value[citation needed]
    • commerce covers a much broader field and includes trade, along with the [1]

    nevertheless, one can speak of "trade in goods and services".[3]

  • etymology
  • history
  • components
  • see also
  • references

Portrait of 16th century merchant Georg Gisze

Commerce is the exchange of goods and services, especially on a large scale.[1] It includes legal, economic, political, social, cultural and technological systems that operate in a country or in international trade.

In the economic sense, "commerce" refers to the conduct of trade among economic agents.[2] Commerce generally affects the well-being and welfare of citizens and residents, as it is known[by whom?] to directly impact the money which people have and their job opportunities as well. The term "commerce" may also refer to the buying and selling of commodities globally or across borders - between governments and between business firms.[citation needed]

Many[quantify] scholars and ancient philosophers have known[by whom?] to mix up the terms "trade" and "commerce". But in essence these two are distinct terms carrying different meanings:

  • Trade, on the one hand, may mean the selling and buying of commodities for money or anything of value[citation needed]
  • Commerce covers a much broader field and includes trade, along with the [1]

Nevertheless, one can speak of "trade in goods and services".[3]