Chinese nationality law

  • nationality law of the
    people's republic of china
    中华人民共和国国籍法
    zhōnghuá rénmín gònghéguó
    guójí fǎ
    national emblem of the people's republic of china (2).svg
    national people's congress
    enacted by5th national people's congress
    passed10 september 1980
    enacted10 september 1980
    related legislation
    nationality law (republic of china)
    status: current legislation
    china
    national emblem of the people's republic of china (2).svg
    this article is part of a series on the
    politics and government of
    china
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    chinese nationality law regulates the acquisition, transmission, and loss of chinese nationality. the law is based on the principle of jus sanguinis, meaning that individuals born to a chinese national parent usually acquire chinese nationality at birth.

    the constitution of the people's republic of china states that all persons holding nationality of china are citizens of china.[1] however, in practice, the citizenship of mainland china is the hukou, while the two special administrative regions, hong kong and macau, each has its own rules on the rights of abode in these territories.

    in theory, the chinese nationality law is de jure applicable to chinese nationals residing in all three constituents of the people's republic of china, namely mainland china, hong kong sar, and macau sar. due to the complex history of hong kong and macau sars, however, special "explanations" of the nationality law were made in place by the national people's congress before the handover of hong kong[2] and macau.[3] these interpretations, applicable only to permanent residents of hong kong or macau, have created a separate class of chinese nationality unique to those two sars, which differs vastly, especially with the acquisition and loss of nationality, from the chinese nationality of mainland chinese residents with hukou.

    the law was adopted at the third session of the fifth national people's congress and promulgated by order no. 8 of the chairman of the standing committee of the national people's congress and effective as of september 10, 1980.

  • history
  • nationality by birth
  • naturalization
  • loss, termination and renunciation of nationality
  • restoration of nationality
  • visa requirements
  • dual nationality
  • hong kong and macau
  • taiwan
  • chinese nationality and hukou
  • see also
  • references

Nationality Law of the
People's Republic of China
中华人民共和国国籍法
Zhōnghuá Rénmín Gònghéguó
Guójí Fǎ
National Emblem of the People's Republic of China (2).svg
National People's Congress
Enacted by5th National People's Congress
Passed10 September 1980
Enacted10 September 1980
Related legislation
Nationality Law (Republic of China)
Status: Current legislation
National Emblem of the People's Republic of China (2).svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
China

Chinese nationality law regulates the acquisition, transmission, and loss of Chinese nationality. The law is based on the principle of jus sanguinis, meaning that individuals born to a Chinese national parent usually acquire Chinese nationality at birth.

The constitution of the People's Republic of China states that all persons holding nationality of China are citizens of China.[1] However, in practice, the citizenship of Mainland China is the hukou, while the two special administrative regions, Hong Kong and Macau, each has its own rules on the rights of abode in these territories.

In theory, the Chinese Nationality Law is de jure applicable to Chinese nationals residing in all three constituents of the People's Republic of China, namely mainland China, Hong Kong SAR, and Macau SAR. Due to the complex history of Hong Kong and Macau SARs, however, special "explanations" of the Nationality Law were made in place by the National People's Congress before the handover of Hong Kong[2] and Macau.[3] These interpretations, applicable only to permanent residents of Hong Kong or Macau, have created a separate class of Chinese nationality unique to those two SARs, which differs vastly, especially with the acquisition and loss of nationality, from the Chinese nationality of Mainland Chinese residents with hukou.

The law was adopted at the Third Session of the Fifth National People's Congress and promulgated by Order No. 8 of the Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress and effective as of September 10, 1980.